Install Visio volume license alongside Office 365

At my company we get a certain number of seats of Visio volume license from our Microsoft Partner benefits, but it is not a subscription product and the volume key cannot be simply entered to activate Visio, because our Office 365 is installed as O365ProPlusRetail.

Here I’ll describe how to install the Visio volume license product side-by-side with our standard installation of Office 365, which is a supported scenario according to this Microsoft doc.

At first I had problems where installing the product “VisioPro2019Volume” would downgrade my O365 build to the 1808 version. I posted a comment on this Microsoft Docs issue because it seemed related, and received a very helpful reply from Martin with another Microsoft Docs page describing how to build lean and dynamic install packages for O365. This was the key to configuring my XML file for proper side-by-side installation.

I also used the super helpful Office Customization Tool in support of figuring this out.

Procedure

    1. Download the Office Deployment Tool
    2. Install the tool to a folder on your workstation. Create a new XML file named “newvisio.xml” to look like this (update the PIDKEY value)
<Configuration ID="6659a04f-037d-4f23-b8a2-64c851090a5e"	>
  <Add Version="MatchInstalled" 	>
    <Product ID="VisioPro2019Volume" PIDKEY="insert Key"	>
      <Language ID="MatchInstalled" TargetProduct="O365ProPlusRetail" /	>
    </Product	>
  </Add	>
</Configuration	>
  1. Note: You can get the Key from the Partner portal (go into MPN ? Benefits ? Software) and enter it into your xml file
  2. If you have Visio installed already as part of O365, you will need to remove it:
      1. Create yourself a configuration xml file named removevisio.xml:
    <Configuration ID="ba49a53d-04c0-44a6-b591-c099d9c4e6ed">
      <Remove OfficeClientEdition="64" Channel="Monthly">
        <Product ID="VisioProRetail">
          <Language ID="en-us" />
          <ExcludeApp ID="Access" />
          <ExcludeApp ID="Excel" />
          <ExcludeApp ID="Groove" />
          <ExcludeApp ID="Lync" />
          <ExcludeApp ID="OneDrive" />
          <ExcludeApp ID="OneNote" />
          <ExcludeApp ID="Outlook" />
          <ExcludeApp ID="PowerPoint" />
          <ExcludeApp ID="Publisher" />
          <ExcludeApp ID="Teams" />
          <ExcludeApp ID="Word" />
        </Product>
      </Remove>
      <Display Level="Full" AcceptEULA="TRUE" />
    </Configuration>
    1. Place this file where the deployment tool was downloaded, and then run it:
    2. setup /configure removevisio.xml
    3. The uninstall will proceed. You’ll see an image like this; don’t be alarmed its not removing all of office if you set your XML properly
  3. Once the previous version uninstall is complete, install with this command:
  4. setup /configure newvisio.xml
  5. Now you should have Office 365 on subscription, but Visio on Volume License.

Update SCCM Maintenance Window through PowerShell

Sometimes trying to stay bleeding edge is tough – today’s example is when you want to install updates through SCCM a day or two after Patch Tuesday, particularly using Maintenance Windows to allow restarts within a specific time frame.

We use automatic deployment rules to update a Software Update Group every Patch Tuesday – scheduling this is easy because its always the second Tuesday of a month.

But I want the updates to install on Wednesday night, or Thursday morning. This ensures strict compliance requirements can be met, but allows 24 hours for testing. Can’t just schedule the install and restarts for “second Wednesday of the month” though, because if the first of the month is a Wednesday (like this month) then our actual install date happens to be the THIRD Wednesday of the month.

Previously we solved this by manually updating Maintenance Window schedules every month, painstaking selecting the right date and hoping we didn’t mess it up.

PowerShell took that risk away:

 

SCCM_UpdateMaintenanceWindowSchedule.ps1 – on GitHub

 

See the comments on the script for details of how it works. As a very brief overview:

I found Tim Curwick’s method of calculating Patch Tuesday, and used that in my script to reliably calculate my Wednesday or Thursday install date.

This script runs as System from an SCCM server on the 1st of every month. It performs the calculation, updates maintenance windows on specific Collections, and outputs a log to file and emails results.

 

SCVMM – Change VM NIC from Static to Dynamic IP

Just a quick post to document how to make a change with System Center Virtual Machine Manager.

I have a VM with a NIC attached to a VM Network that has a Static IP Pool. For a few not-so-great reasons, I need to remove it from that pool back to a Dynamic IP address.

In the GUI, this option is disabled:

Here’s how to accomplish it with PowerShell:

# Get the virtual machine into an object
$vm = Get-SCVirtualMachine -Name "VMNAME"
 
# Find the destination VM Network you want to change to (the one without the Static IP Pool)
$vmnetwork = Get-SCVMNetwork -name "VMNETWORKNAME"
 
# Find the VM Subnet on the VM Network
$vmsubnet = Get-SCVMSubnet -VMNetwork $vmnetwork #Assume single subnet
 
# Using the pipe to find the NIC (assume single NIC), modify the properties to Dynamic
$vm | Get-SCVirtualNetworkAdapter | Set-SCVirtualNetworkAdapter -IPv4AddressType Dynamic -vmsubnet $vmsubnet

Windows 10 insider preview failed to install

I’m running Windows 10 insider preview on my basement computer at home, and sometime in the middle of summer it started failing to update to the latest release. I finally made some time to troubleshoot this last night and got it working.

During the install, it would get about 40% of the way through, and then fail with this error:

Windows could not configure one or more system components

After some sleuthing I discovered the log file for the upgrade could be found here: C:\Windows\Panther\NewOs\Panther, and I looked at the “setuperror.log” file.

In this, there were a couple of key errors noted:

0xd0000034 Failed to add user mode driver [%SystemRoot%\system32\DRIVERS\UMDF\uicciso.dll]

Failure while calling IPreApply->PreApply for Plugin={ServerPath="Microsoft-Windows-IIS-RM\iismig.dll"

Generic Command ErrorCode: 80004005 Executable: iissetup.exe ExitCode: 13 Phase: 38 Mode: Install (first install) Component: Microsoft-Windows-IIS-SharedLibraries-GC

I did come across a search hit when looking for the “uicciso.dll” error that spoke about IIS install failing with a Windows 10 update, and those two things seemed to correlate with the errors I was seeing in the logs.

I ran this DISM command to see the additional Win10 features that were installed, and noted a whole bunch that I don’t ever recall having put on manually, and certainly weren’t needed:

 dism /online /get-features /format:table

I collected a bunch, turned it into a removal command, ran them and restarted:

dism /online /disable-feature /FeatureName:SMB1Protocol-Server
dism /online /disable-feature /FeatureName:SMB1Protocol
dism /online /disable-feature /FeatureName:MSMQ-Server
dism /online /disable-feature /FeatureName:MSMQ-Container
dism /online /disable-feature /FeatureName:WCF-Services45
dism /online /disable-feature /FeatureName:WCF-TCP-Activation45 
dism /online /disable-feature /FeatureName:WCF-Pipe-Activation45 
dism /online /disable-feature /FeatureName:WCF-MSMQ-Activation45 
dism /online /disable-feature /FeatureName:WCF-TCP-PortSharing45 
dism /online /disable-feature /FeatureName:WAS-ConfigurationAPI
dism /online /disable-feature /FeatureName:WAS-WindowsActivationService 
dism /online /disable-feature /FeatureName:WAS-ProcessModel 
dism /online /disable-feature /FeatureName:IIS-RequestFiltering
dism /online /disable-feature /FeatureName:IIS-Security
dism /online /disable-feature /FeatureName:IIS-ApplicationDevelopment 
dism /online /disable-feature /FeatureName:IIS-NetFxExtensibility45
dism /online /disable-feature /FeatureName:IIS-WebServerRole 
dism /online /disable-feature /FeatureName:IIS-WebServer 
dism /online /disable-feature /FeatureName:NetFx4-AdvSrvs 
dism /online /disable-feature /FeatureName:NetFx4Extended-ASPNET45

After the restart I let the upgrade run, and it completed successfully!

 

Windows Updates failing on Azure VM

While playing around with some VMs in Azure, I ran into an issue where they could not perform Windows Updates. This was first noticed with failing Update deployments through Azure Automation:

In order to narrow down the issue, I tried to manually run Windows Updates from the VM itself. I confirmed that public Internet was accessible, but still received this error:

There were some problems installing updates, but we'll try again later. If you keep seeing this and want to search the web or contact support for information, this may help: (0x8024402f)

I ran the PowerShell command “Get-WindowsUpdateLog” which populates C:\Windows\WindowsUpdate.log (new behavior in Server 2016), and only found a brief error showing:

Failed to retrieve SLS response data for service

It was right around this time that I noticed a popup for memory exhaustion on this VM.The VM size I had chosen included 2GB of RAM.

I did a little test, and looked at Task Manager prior to running Windows Update – 45% of memory used:

Then I clicked “Retry” and saw the memory utilization ramp up to 55%, 75%, 85%, 95% and then the Windows Update process returned an error and Task Manager immediately dropped back down to 45% memory utilization.

It appears that memory exhaustion was causing the Windows Update process to crash out. What I don’t understand is why the page file didn’t come into play and grow to accommodate the memory demand; it was set to System Managed and there was more than enough space on the temporary disk to grow into.

 

After I increased the VM size with 4GB of RAM, it updated without issue.